Finals in London consists of walking back home from the academic centre at 11 o’clock on a Saturday night while guys in tuxedos and girls in stilletos dash about the city attending Christmas parties. I’ve heard more raucous party goers and wailing ambulances this past weekend than any other. These kids are very into their Christmas parties and they do not pretend to call them “holiday” parties.

Finals in London consists of walking back home from the academic centre at 11 o’clock on a Saturday night while guys in tuxedos and girls in stilletos dash about the city attending Christmas parties. I’ve heard more raucous party goers and wailing ambulances this past weekend than any other. These kids are very into their Christmas parties and they do not pretend to call them “holiday” parties.

Continuing from the earlier post on A Mad World, My Masters we saw at Stratford: Stratford-upon-Avon happens to be very photogenic, for those wondering. The boats are named after Shakespeare’s characters, because that’s how they do things in the town where Shakespeare was born and is buried, y’know - not a tourist attraction.

This is rather belated, but I don’t want to miss mentioning the brilliant production our Shakespeare and Elizabethan Stage class saw at Stratford-upon-Avon.
Our professor chose to show us a Royal Shakespeare Company production of Thomas Middleton’s A Mad World, My Masters rather than a Shakespeare play while on our visit to Stratford-upon-Avon. The play grapples with some tough issues such as excessive wealth, familial relations, and female sexuality and submissiveness - topics that can be controversial even now, some four hundred years later. The production we saw was adapted to be set in the 1950’s (rather than in Middleton’s 1605) which perhaps aided it to appear as raunchy and hilarious to an audience 400 years later as the original must have been to audiences in 1605. While the familiar musical numbers (original songs from the 50s) allowed some insight into the characters, they also perhaps served to remind the audience that these issues are not so far from our current society as we would like them to be.

This is rather belated, but I don’t want to miss mentioning the brilliant production our Shakespeare and Elizabethan Stage class saw at Stratford-upon-Avon.

Our professor chose to show us a Royal Shakespeare Company production of Thomas Middleton’s A Mad World, My Masters rather than a Shakespeare play while on our visit to Stratford-upon-Avon. The play grapples with some tough issues such as excessive wealth, familial relations, and female sexuality and submissiveness - topics that can be controversial even now, some four hundred years later. The production we saw was adapted to be set in the 1950’s (rather than in Middleton’s 1605) which perhaps aided it to appear as raunchy and hilarious to an audience 400 years later as the original must have been to audiences in 1605. While the familiar musical numbers (original songs from the 50s) allowed some insight into the characters, they also perhaps served to remind the audience that these issues are not so far from our current society as we would like them to be.

Way too entertaining string quartet at Covent Garden last Saturday. 

My visit to Notting Hill consisted of being delighted by rows of colourful houses, waffles, pretty books, interesting “street-style”, and indecision over which checkered, warm scarf to buy (resulting in not buying any). I did purchase an old (and warm) hat which has led me to a series of questions, such as: should I have bought a hat that is twice the size of my head, should I have bought a hat made of lamb fur (which I realised later), should I really be seen wearing this hat in public, and, most importantly, should I have this hat dry-cleaned?

For those interested in whether I should be seen in public wearing the hat, the guy who sold me the hat said I looked cool with it on. And, like, the vendor’s totally unbiased opinion should be all that matters.

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NYU Senior in London Fall 2013